Flight Simulator Around the World Race

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NOTAMs

For up to the minute NOTAMS please check the NOTAMS forum located below

http://www.fsrtwrace.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=14

Closest Race Ever Concludes in a Dramatic Finish over the Black Sea

(Wednesday, February 19, 2014)

The 2014 Round the World Race was completed on Monday night with the three teams racing over the Black Sea into Sochi's URSS. After racing for fifty eight continuous hours, the end of the race was the closest ever. Team AVSIM finished at Sochi first but was carrying thirty five minutes' more penalty time as Team FlightSim and Team Sim-Outhouse came barreling in over the sea. Everyone was watching the clock and the visual flight tracker and the clock again - while trying to estimate whether the penalty margin would be enough or not. As fsxar177 and mickj300 screeched to a stop on the floodlit tarmac we all discovered that the difference was three minutes - FlightSim was not quite able to maintain the gap.

Sim-Outhouse, flying accident-free, slipped in just before Team FlightSim for second "on the ground" though they carried a slightly larger accumulated penalty and finished third overall.

Mr. Murphy, the carrier of ill-fortune, visited all three teams in about equal measure; but in the end, the maladies were allocated about equally so that the race was pretty much determined in the air. The finale showed just how equal are the teams' flying, planning, and organizing talents.

Trophy

The Wilhelm "Wilhe" Bendit Trophy

Race Finish Order and Net Race Time

The finishing times, counting the net bonuses and penalties accrued during the race, are:

Team Avsim 55:51
Team Flightsim 55:54
Team Sim-Outhouse 57:29

Congratulations to the 44 pilots who participated in this year's dramatic event. Kudos all around.

Additional individual awards for performance will be announced in the coming days.

Image of Flight Tracking in the last minutes of the Race

raceend

The Executive Committee offers our thanks to all who participated.

RTWR 2014 Race Announced

First, we are pleased to announce that the 2014 Round the World Race will commence, as is traditional, on the first weekend after Valentine's Day. This year we shall start on Saturday, February 15, and probably earlier in the day than usual.

Second, we want to announce that Ed Keller will take the Austin Davis seat on the RTWR Executive Committee. Importantly, we want to express to Austin our deeply-felt appreciation for what he has done for the race both during the last year on the Committee and also during many previous years as well. Ed will bring to the table both new perspectives and a great enthusiasm for the RTWR itself.

Third, we are considering an expanded use of faster more modern aircraft, among those proven in past races, in order to increase the overall average speed and reduce flying hours.

Fourth, we are working on reducing the time commitment demanded by the Race. A number of pilots have stated that they are no longer able to dedicate the same effort to the event as they have in the past. While understanding those concerns, we are also keen to maintain the challenge of Round-the-World real-time real-weather high-adrenaline racing. For many, the RTWR is the prime team event in our flight simulation community.

While there may be many ways to go forward, two main options have been discussed. One would be a route redefinition that, while maintaining the spirit of global racing, would involve shorter overall distances. A second would involve splitting the event into two weekends which would allow racers to begin the race one weekend, pause during the normal work-week, and finish on the following weekend. (Racing would remain a round-the-clock event during the weekend windows.)

We would like to invite your comments, concerns, and suggestions about how to modulate the time commitment so as to make the race more manageable for those who also participate in a real life. In particular, we want to know how people feel about moving toward a two-weekend schedule this year or in the future.

RTWR 2013 Final Outcome Announced

The eleventh running of the Around-The-World-Race (RTWR 2013) was completed very early on Wednesday morning (UTC). The Race began in Cape Town at 1500UTC Saturday and ran around the clock until the teams completed the circuit in the South African darkness.

This year's winner is Team AVSIM who managed to finish a smoothly executed error-free race. While outperformed in some respects by Team FlightSim and Team Sim-Outhouse, the AVSIM crew managed an overall performance that gave them the win.

The final "Race Times" (elapsed time adjusted for penalties and bonuses) are:

Team AVSIM: 76:18
Team FlightSim: 77:47
Team Sim-Outhouse: 80:19

Congratulations to all the participants who managed to keep the batons flying through day and night, through tropical lows and Aleutian snowstorms, and into and out of mountain airstrips. All the Teams and pilots are commended on a job well done. The Tornado Trophy having been retired after a decade, we are happy to announce Team AVSIM as the first recipients of the Bendit Trophy.

Feb 11 2003 - Rules Clarifications and Corrections

2013 Special Rules
Rule 3. Routing

The closed airport at Woody Island is identified as Z24D. This is the ICAO identifier in FS9. The correct ICAO identifier for FSX is VH84

Feb 11 2003 - 2013 RTWR Rules

The Rules for the 2013 Race have been released

RTWR Special Rules_2013.pdf

RTWR Special Rules FAQ_2013.pdf

RTWR Race Administration_2013.pdf

RTWR 2013 Rules Changes since Draft 0.90..pdf

Jan 11 2003 - Announcing the MSFS Round the World Race 2013

We are happy to announce that the 2013 Round the World Race will be run this year. The start date is traditionally the first Saturday after Valentine's Day. That is February 16, 2013.

We have lost three members of the Executive Committee. Although they may be around to give sage advice, Matt Smith, Reggie Fields and Ian Dale will no longer be active participants. We should all express our deep gratitude for the great contributions that Matt, Reggie and Ian have made to the RTWR event and the flight simulation community more generally.

That leaves the two of us. Although some of the 2013 Race Planning has been accomplished, we shall have to ask the community for a great deal of help in mounting this year's event. We should like to expand the number of participants in the overall organization of the event – asking that a number of veteran racers take on a management-leadership role. In the next few days, we'll be making more explicit our requests.

In this note, we merely want to announce (a) that the RTWR2013 will take place in more-or-less the way that we have done over the last decade and (b) that we are going to have to make some organizational changes and ask the community to take on a more active role in governance.

Thanks for your help and understanding.

Mike MacKuen
Rob Ibey

2012 Race Results

1st Place - Sim-OutHouse

76 hrs 34 min Gross Race Time
35 hrs 30 min Bonuses
00 hrs 30 min Penalties
41 hrs 34 min Net Race Time

2nd Place - FlightSim

79 hrs 46 min Gross Race Time
35 hrs 30 min Bonuses
01 hrs 00 min Penalties
45 hrs 16 min Net Race Time

3rd Place - Avsim

87 hrs 47 min Gross Race Time
35 hrs 30 min Bonuses
00 hrs 38 min Penalties
52 hrs 55 min Net Race Time

2011 RACE FINISHED, FLIGHTSIM.COM DECLARED WINNER

First Place - Flightsim.com

Total Race Time - 78:50:00
Bonuses - 12:30:00
Penalties - 1:00:00
Net Bonus - 11:30:00
Net Race Time = 67:20:00

Avsim.com - Second Place

Total Race Time - 79:46:00
Bonuses - 12:30:00
Penalties - 2:30:00
Net Bonus - 10:00:00
Net Race Time = 69:46:00

Sim-Outhouse.net - Third Place

Total Race Time - 80:51:00
Bonuses - 12:30:00
Penalties - 1:30:00
Net Bonus - 11:00:00
Net Race Time = 69:51:00

iFlyOnline.com - Fourth Place

Total Race Time - 84:03:00
Bonuses - 11:30:00
Penalties - 1:45:00
Net Bonus - 9:45:00
Net Race Time = 74:18:00

2011 RTW Race Rules Updated, NOTAMs Released, Briefing Committees Given Team Passwords, Allowed to Unlock One Briefing Sheet

29 January 2011

Minor updates and corrections to both the General Rules and 2011 Special Rules and their FAQs have now been posted. Pilots who were previously confused by particular points should recheck the rules for clarification. Substantive changes have not been made; we have simply updated the documents to be clearer and, where errors were noted, fixed the errors.

Notices to Airmen for the 2011 RTW Race may be found here.

Finally, team briefing committees have been issued passwords for the briefing sheet system and allowed to unlock one continent.

2011 RTW Special Rules Released, Official Starting Time Announced

2011 RTW Race Information

14 February 2011

Official Starting Time: 10:00 AM US Eastern Time (1500Z) Saturday, 19 February, 2011 for the Optional Start Event.

The Race portion will begin at 11:00 AM US Eastern Time (1600Z) Saturday, 19 February, 2011.

DOWNLOAD THE 2011 SPECIAL RULES HERE.

DOWNLOAD THE 2011 SPECIAL RULES FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FILE HERE.

2011 RTW Start Date: 19 February 2011

29 January 2011

We're happy to announce that the 2011 RTW Race will begin on 19 February 2011. Pilots should anticipate that the race will run for approximately four days.

2011 RTW Race Announced!

26 January 2011

We will indeed be holding an RTW Race this year.

Details have yet to be fully decided, but the race will be held in approximately one month; in the third week of February.

At this time, we're happy to extend invitations to participate in this year's to each of the teams that competed in last year's race.

We look forward to having another spirited event in approximately a month's time!

FS.com NCRG-NIUE Leg Declared Invalid on Appeal, Race Results Unchanged

10 March 2010

Upon further review, the Flightsim.com leg from NCRG to NIUE has been declared invalid.

The Executive Committee decision on this matter may be found here.

The Committee imputes to FS.com the intent to transfer the baton retroactively to their wingman, thus increasing their race time by a net 30 minutes and preserving their first-place finish.

RACE FINISHED, FLIGHTSIM.COM DECLARED WINNER

First Place - Flightsim.com

Baton is Free at EGMH post was at 09:57 UTC Wed 2/24

Bonuses - 33:00
Penalties - 01:15
Net Bonus - 31:45
89:27 = Total Race Time
57:42 = Net Race Time

Avsim.com - Second Place

Baton is Free at EGMH post was at 11:54 UTC Wed 2/24

Bonuses - 33:00
Penalties - 00:30
Net Bonus - 32:30
91:24 = Total Race Time
58:54 = Net Race Time

Sim-Outhouse.net - Third Place

Baton is Free at EGMH post was at 12:00 UTC Wed 2/24

Bonuses - 33:00
Penalties - 02:06
Net Bonus - 30:54
91:30 = Total Race Time
60:36 = Net Race Time

iFlyOnline.com - Fourth Place

Baton is Free at EGMH post was at 17:45 UTC Wed 2/24 on backup forum.

Bonuses - 33:00
Penalties - 02:36
Net Bonus - 30:24
97:15 = Total Race Time
66:51 = Net Race Time

Default Piper J-3 Replacement Flight Dynamics

21 February 2010

Thanks to Alex Metzger and Tom Falley, we are able to provide an upgraded flight dynamics file to race pilots wishing to fly the default Piper J-3. It may be downloaded here.

Europe Continental Briefing Sheet Unveiled for All Teams

19 February 2010

The Briefing Committees of all teams have been notified of their access codes to the Continental Briefing Sheet system, and the Europe Continental Briefing Sheet - the first of six - has been unveiled for all teams. Pilots should contact a member of their team's Briefing Committee to find out more.

NOTAM: Files for the 2010 Race

18 February 2010

Reggie Fields has put together a scenery file adding an airport in Dunkirk, as well as flight plans and FS Navigator files which pilots may find useful. These files are not required to fly in the race - however we suspect that participants will want to have them. They are available for both FS9 and FSX

Special Rules for 2010 Published, First Briefing Sheet to be unveiled 0900 Friday

18 February 2010

The Special Rules for the 2010 Race are now available on the 'Rules' page. A detailed FAQ explaining the rules may be downloaded from the FAQ page. The first Continental Briefing Sheet will be unveiled at 9AM on Friday.

Thank You: John, Jared, Paul, and Eamonn

18 February 2010

The Executive Committee wants to thank John Mueller, Jared Smith, Paul Beaudoin, and Eamonn Watson for providing invaluable technical assistance during the preparation for this year's race. The race could truly not be run without such dedicated and skilled technical advisors.

2010 Race Preview

11 February 2010

It's our pleasure to today reveal to the community a preview of this year's race. We're not revealing too many details, but we want to give everyone a heads-up about certain things. We'll monitor the various team forums and, of course, our own forum on this website, for questions.

  1. Weather.

    In 2010 all pilots will use the MSFS Default (Jeppesen) weather engine. Select Real weather with 15 minute updates (if you can possibly do so).

    It is now apparent that we need a level playing field with respect to the weather. Other weather systems have terrific features, but the need for competitive balance mandates this uniform standard. You may use the textures of the other weather programs, of course, but must use the MSFS weather engine.

  2. Informal Norms.

    We would like to encourage pilots to fly in a realistic world. In particular, we want to avoid pressure to fly over a "bald earth," without terrain or autogen, with merely minimal cloud coverage. On the other hand, we understand that some pilots' computers impose limits on the realism with which they can fly—and they should choose reasonable settings for their machines. So for the moment, we lay out a set of norms. Think of these as minimum standards for pilots with modern computers. They apply to both FS2004 and FSX unless otherwise noted.

    • Scenery. Autogen density: Normal. Scenery Complexity: Normal.
    • Mesh. Keep the terrain mesh you normally use. A minimum standard would be default mesh (with a 38m resolution setting in FSX only).
    • Weather. Weather options: Real-world weather (updated every 15 minutes). Cloud draw distance: 60mi. Detailed clouds/Cloud coverage density: Medium. (And for FS2004, 3-D cloud percentage: 100.)
    Again, we appreciate the variety of pilots' computers and merely suggest these as informal norms.
  3. Aircraft types.

    Beyond the normal range of aircraft, teams might want to practice their water landings before the race.

  4. NOTAMS (New for 2010 - note that unless overturned, previous years' determinations still stand).

    The Epic LT (Lionheart) proved faster than our initial tests in 2009. When flown well above its real operational ceiling, the model can obtain speeds far in excess of any published maximum speeds. Understanding that a number of pilots have purchased this aircraft for the race, we are reluctant to make an outright ban for 2010. Accordingly, the Epic LT is allowed but restricted to a 31,000 ft hard ceiling. (Any flight exceeding 31,000 ft will be considered invalid and must be re-flown. Pilots should give themselves a large margin of error to guard against unexpected weather changes. At its realistic FL280-300 high altitude cruise, the Epic LT is plenty fast.)

    The FSX Acceleration P-51 is allowed in 2010. The rules do not allow for racer versions of aircraft, so this is an exception for 2010.

    Tim Horton has developed the ENB "Bloom" utility that provides night vision for FS2004 and FSX. This clever night vision utility, or any similar modification, is not allowed in the race.

    In general, pilots may not use gauges or special effects that produce unrealistic aircraft behavior. This includes, by way of specific example, the "arrester gauge" designed for carrier traps and used elsewhere.

    Subsonic jets remain those whose max_mach (Mmo) parameter is no greater than 1.00. We have no sure way to assess the actual level-flight characteristics of all jets without conducting extensive tests that are beyond our capability.

    FSX pilots may use Jim Keir's "Lumberjack" scenery files as appropriate. (Search for agexcl_3x.zip and agexcl_5x.zip.)

  5. Continental Briefing Sheets.

    In addition to the normal requirements, teams must land at the same 12 designated airports, located two per continent. Those 12 airports are fixed before the race, probabilistically selected by the chair of the Executive Committee, who does not participate in the race, and their identities described in six separate password-protected briefing sheets. Teams will be able to request the passwords to these sheets as they proceed around the world. The system works in the following way:

    1. At least 24 hours before the race, each team will receive the full set of briefing sheets, a secret team access code, and the password to the first continent's briefing sheet—which may be unlocked immediately. Teams are responsible for maintaining the security of these items.

    2. Teams become eligible to request the password for one (1) additional continent upon reaching (that is, completing a leg at) the first designated airport at which they arrive on a given continent, or shortly thereafter, (but not another when reaching the second designated airport.) They then unlock the briefing sheet and proceed accordingly. Thus teams are able to ‘see’ only one continent into the future routing of the race.

    3. Password requests must not be made before a team becomes eligible to make them. Because the system is automated, the requested password will be sent whenever it is requested, regardless of whether the team is eligible. Thus the integrity of the race depends on strict adherence to this rule. Accordingly, we have put the following security measure into place:

    4. All password requests are logged. Premature password requests will be investigated and assessed an eight (8) hour penalty per request. Again, the responsibility for maintaining security lies with the team.

    5. Password requests are made in the following manner:

      1. Send an email to fsrtwrace@gmail.com with an empty body. The subject line should include the name of the continent followed by a space and the team access code.
      2. An email will automatically be sent with password requested.
      3. In the event of an error, the team may contact the RTWR Executive Committee member acting as Duty Officer at the current time. A schedule and email addresses will be provided.

    6. Anticipating a question:
      Q. Since we get only one briefing sheet at a time, how do we know which continent to choose or in what order to visit them?
      A. Everyone begins at the same point and that will determine the "first" continent. All continents have similar possibilities, challenges, and alternate routings, so the order of subsequent continents depends not on content but rather on a team's preference for an overall route. Teams should decide their next continent as early as possible so there is no confusion about which briefing sheet they wish to open next.

      This briefing sheet system will - we promise - simplify planning and introduce a touch of mystery to the event.

  6. Continental Briefing Sheets - Preparation.

    Teams need to organize a way to maintain internal control over the unlocked briefing sheet files and the team access code. If the access code is made public, then anyone can use it to make bogus requests. Teams are responsible for maintaining the security of their team access code and ensuring that it is not used before the team becomes eligible to use it.

    In view of this, each team needs to identify the group of individuals it wishes to grant access to the team password and forward their names and e-mail addresses to the Executive Committee at fsrtwrace@gmail.com before the distribution of the access codes - which happens 24 hours before the race.

  7. Bonus Airports.

    Teams may optionally select a small number of Bonus Airports from a somewhat larger pool. The briefing sheets provide the identities.

  8. Special Events

    At 1400 UTC on Saturday, February 20, 2010, there will be a Kickoff event that rewards the participation of many pilots. The Race portion will begin at 1630 UTC. In addition, there will be optional team flights and an airmanship challenge.

New Executive Committee Member

28 January 2010

It's the very great pleasure of the Executive Committee to welcome Rob Ibey of Sim-Outhouse.com on board as our fifth member. We're glad to have Rob's leadership, creativity, intelligence, and dedication to the race as we work to make it even better.

iFlyOnline.com/FS-MP.com Clarification

3 January 2010

Earlier announcements implied that iFlyOnline.com was participating as a direct successor to FS-MP.com and with the same personnel. This was mistaken; iFlyOnline has taken the place vacated by FS-MP by qualifying in its own right.

2010 Start Date Announced - 20 February

3 January 2010

In keeping with tradition, this year's race will begin the Saturday after St. Valentines' Day - 20 February, 2010.

Forum Opened!

30 December 2010

We have opened a forum on which people may discuss the race or provide feedback to the Executive Committee. You may visit it by clicking on the "Forum" link on the site navigation panel above.

2010 RTW Race Officially Announced

30 December 2010

The RTWR Executive Committee today announces the 2010 Flight Simulator Around-The-World Race. It is our pleasure to invite the same teams that made last year's race our most competitive ever to join us again in 2010; pilots who competed with the now-defunct FS-MP.com will be competing from their new home at iFlyOnline.com. Any interested pilots should visit the discussion forums of the team of their choice for information on joining and guidance on preparation for the race. Team members and others may contact the Executive Committee via the Resources page on this site with any questions. See you in February!

Participants:

Date:

2009 Final Results Announced, Avsim Declared Winner

26 February 2009

We have announced the final results for what was possibly the most exciting Around-the-World race ever. Teams did an excellent job of flying and navigating and the margin of victory this time around was slimmer than ever before. The committee congratulates Team Avsim for a hard-fought and well-won victory, and all of the other teams for an especially well-run race. See you next year!

2009 Results: Avsim wins in closest-ever race!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Final Standings for the 2009 FS Round the World Race



February 21-February 26, 2009














Final


Real Time


Bonus

Penalty


Net Time

Margin

 


Standings


Hours


Hours

Hours


Hours


 


 









 


AVSIM


101:45:00


48:00:00

2:00:00


55:45:00

--

 


FlightSim


96:39:00


43:30:00

3:15:00


56:24:00

0:39:00

 


FS-MP


99:33:00


46:30:00

3:30:00


56:33:00

0:48:00

 


Sim-Outhouse


107:16:00


48:00:00

5:24:00


64:40:00

8:55:00

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2009 RTW Race NOTAMS

20 February 2009

The following is a list of notices and appeals findings relevant to the 2009 RTW Race.

Any autohovering feature is banned from use in the race.

The Cockpit Sharing feature of FSX may be used in the race, provided the baton pilot is in direct control of the aircraft's control surfaces and powerplant for at least 50% of the flight, and at all times when the aircraft is below 2500' above ground level.

Because there exist several weather engines that attempt to improve on MSFS, and because the race encourages realism, pilots are allowed to substitute these addons for MSFS weather. This provision is open to abuse as pilots might tactically choose a weather engine that yields the easiest weather at any given circumstance. In accord with the principles of fair play, pilots should not abuse the rule for competitive advantage. In normal circumstances, pilots should choose a single weather engine and fly that weather engine for the entire race. (In some circumstances, Team Flights for example, pilots may want to synchronize their weather to a common standard. Or pilots may adopt an addon during the race in order to pursue more realism.) This ruling is not strictly enforceable. We trust that we all can rely on pilot's honor here.

The following are approved for use in the special starting event:

The following is banned from use in the 2009 RTWR:

Supermarine Spiteful - Top speed is exceeded by 42 KTAS and the range seems very optimistic as well. Further, the aircraft is given two drop tanks in the aircraft.cfg but no tanks are modeled in the visual model. These excessive speeds and range give the Spiteful a competitive advantage over more reasonably modeled equivalent aircraft.

The following is approved for use in the 2009 RTWR:

Epic LT (Lionheart) - This aircraft is neither unreasonably unrealistic nor too fast to be competitive with other, similar aircraft. It is therefore approved.

Aircraft NOTAMS:
 
New 2009
 
AlphaSim A-3 Skywarrior – The payware version fuel tanks are improperly configured. Since AlphaSim has not issued a corrected flight dynamics, the AlphaSim RB-66 flight dynamics and fuel tank configuration may be used should jet aircraft be allowed during the RTW. Alternately, the v1 version of the A-3 Skywarrior fuel tank configuration from AlphaSim may be used. Custom fuel configurations are not allowed per General Rule 6.iii.b)
 
AlphaSim Westland Lynx – Practices have been noted with a version of this aircraft which reaches speeds in excess of 300KIAS. This is clearly beyond the capabilities of the real world aircraft, and the physics of helicopter flight. The world record for helicopter flight is 216.46 KIAS over a 15KM course. Any FlightSim helicopter capable of speeds in excess of 220KIAS will be deemed invalid and unusable for the race.
 
AlphaSim Grumman F7F TigerCat – The default AlphaSim aircraft had issues with the flight dynamics and fuel tank configuration. Tom Falley has updated the flight dynamics which meet RTW requirements. The Day Fighter FD were approved for the 2007 race. The Night Fighter version with a 300 gallon drop tank was not approved for 2008 due to being released less than two weeks before the race start. Both versions are now approved for RTW usage. The base aircraft can be downloaded from AlphaSim’s freeware section or the file name alpf7ftg.zip on FlightSim.com. Note there are other files available with the model, but the flight dynamics in those files are not approved. The updated flight dynamics are available on Sim-Outhouse – Tigerkitty-2.zip for the Day Fighter and F7F3-N.zip for the Night Fighter. Search for files by the creator name filger747. SOH also has a sound set and a panel for the aircraft available – search by creator name OBIO.
 
Lionheart Epic LT (Epic Dynasty) – The LT is the kit version. The Dynasty is the FAA-certified version intended for 2010 deliveries. Epic website information is that more than 20 LT aircraft are flying. FAA registration information backs that claim. The aircraft is eligible for the RTW.
 
California Classic Douglas DC-7 Series – California Classic has issued new flight dynamics in the summer 2008 for their popular DC-7 aircraft. These FD result in slower top-end speeds such as used during the RTW. Previous versions of the flight dynamics as downloaded from CalClassic are eligible for continued use during the race.
 
Pilatus PC-21 – this aircraft has reached over 20 models in production and is eligible for the RTW. Note that no FS flight models have been tested, so any aircraft used in the RTW must meet/ be very close to published performance standards - http://www.pilatus-aircraft.com/media/Pilatus-PC-21-Fact-Sheet.pdf
 
Summary of past years:
 
V-22 Osprey – this aircraft is eligible since the 2007 race due to reaching the required number of aircraft in service. The V-22 is a twin-turboprop and may not be used to satisfy helicopter requirements.
 
VTOL Gauge – the Rob Barendregt VTOL Gauge for near automated helicopter/ vertical takeoffs, hover and landing is not authorized for use in the RTW, for the V-22 or any helicopter. Nor are any similar autohover gauges allowed.
 
APPEALS FINDINGS FROM PREVIOUS YEARS:
 
Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation – there are several models of the Connie available, however all versions have flight dynamics issues. The only Flight Dynamic for the Connie authorized for the RTW is the Wolfram Beckert airfile (and the Hansjoerg Naegele-Jan Visser panel). Look for vcon20.zip and follow the instructions carefully. A complete package of Mike Stone’s model, airfile, panel and sound is available at FlightSim.com. Look for Luis da Costa Pereira as the compiler of the packages for the L-1049G and EC-121.
 
The FSD Piaggio Avanti may be flown without any modification.  Though its 'speed' as measured by descending flight was high, its 'power' as measured in level flight was not, and we therefore find it suitable for the race.

The Tom “Gnoopey” Kohler P-47 is eligible for the race.  Its 'power' as measured by level flight performance in standard atmospheric conditions was extremely close to the best known values for the real aircraft.  Its 'speed,' as measured by dive performance, was higher than our best value, however we don't find this a significant enough reason to disqualify it.
 
Alpha Simulations DH Hornet – This aircraft is physically modeled with wing tanks on the naval version, but not in the other versions. The aerodynamics use the same airfile and aircraft.cfg and perform identically. Thus, the differences are merely cosmetic. The aircraft is also too fast by a margin larger than we would prefer. However, there are also several other aircraft with maximum speeds similarly above the margin. Hence, all versions of the AlphaSim Hornet are eligible.

Shockwave Wings of Power P-51H
The P-51H relied on an ADI system to dampen the danger of detonation when the engine was run at high manifold pressures. But that ADI was time-limited by the amount of liquid available. Shockwave has not modeled that time-limitation into the simulation. Thus, while the P-51H has a maximum speed that is almost exactly right, the FS model can fly at that speed for much longer than could the actual aircraft. The difficulty is that this "violation" of reality—aircraft able to maintain maximum speed only for limited times—is widely shared by many aircraft. And there is no reliable and uniform standard for making corrections. (The exact same problem applies to the other P-51H, the Do-335, several late-model P-47s, the Howard 500, and most of the complex high power piston engines of the post war period. A different version of the same problem exists with many other high performance aircraft.) The Shockwave P-51H is eligible for the race.
 
Aircraft not eligible for the RTW:
The decisions here do not necessarily reflect on the overall quality of any aircraft model. The design of FS aircraft necessarily involves many compromises. Understandably, many designers choose not to design for performance right at the edge of the flight envelope. But that is where the Race is run. So we shall be in a position of finding some aircraft unsuitable for RTW Race even if they are otherwise excellent aircraft. And, of course, reasonable performance at the edge does not necessarily recommend the aircraft for other purposes.  In all instances we endeavor to arrive at a solution that allows pilots to fly their favorite aircraft while not giving anyone an unrealistic advantage.  We arrive at our decisions after thorough flight testing and having consulted as many knowledgeable people as we realistically can.
 
For clarification, there are three primary areas of concern for the RTW Race.  We shall term them, for simplicity, power, speed, and fuel economy.  Power refers to the speed an aircraft can maintain in level flight – this comes from the power of its engines – and is our primary concern when considering aircraft eligibility.  Speed refers to the maximum airframe structural speed – the speed at which the aircraft overstresses or encounters compressibility.  Finally, fuel economy refers to how quickly an aircraft burns fuel.  Our primary concern with fuel economy is the range of an aircraft: we aren't too concerned about people being able to take out fuel to reduce weight, as this doesn't normally impact the race in a significant manner.  The most important of these criteria is 'power' as this most significantly affects what an aircraft can do in a race.  Extreme cases involving speed and fuel economy will be considered, however we will generally allow for some leeway on these.
 
FSX Acceleration P-51 – This is a racer version of the aircraft and not allowed under the RTW rules.
 
F2G – Goodyear’s last version of the F4U Corsair – Ten were tested at NAS Patuxent River and found deficient in handling. They were not put in operational service though a few became racing aircraft.
 
Fw 1980-D11 and Ta 152C – The D-11 is labeled as a prototype by Shockwave in their documentation. Apparently 7-13 were built (Shockwave says 7) but we don't know much for sure here--this being a late-war on-the-fly aircraft. The TA 152C is a prototype. (The Fw 190-D9, Fw 190-D13, and the Ta 152H are fine.)
 
ATR72 (ARNZ) Jon Murchison  - This ATR72 is 100+ kts too fast. There exist lots of realistic alternatives. For freeware, look for the excellent version by Francisco Sanchez-Casataner. The FlightOne payware version is a real favorite.
 
BSMP Saab 2000 (Blue-Sky Mine Productions) - A well-known model. But for racing purposes, too powerful and too high a sustained speed—by a long shot.
 
Beech Starship (Mike Stone original and Alaskan Winds modification)
Beech Starship (John B. Loney)
These aircraft is not eligible at this time. The flight dynamics produce unrealistic speeds and range. No other Starship model has been submitted for consideration/validation.

Minor Changes to General Rules

6 February 2009

We have made a few minor modifications to the general rules. They are:

New Team: FS-MP.com

24 January 2009

I'm writing to share some exciting news. The Executive Committee of the race have recently voted to bring a fourth team into the Race: FS-MP.com. This news comes after a fairly long process over which FS-MP showed that they have the numbers, focus, and enthusiasm to join our community.

To accommodate this new team, our technical advisor, John Mueller, will shortly be releasing a new version of the Duenna race tracker.

As part of the process of welcoming a new team to the race, we will be hosting an information session over TeamSpeak next Monday evening (2/2) at 6PM Eastern Time, 11PM GMT. Anyone planning on flying in the race for any team is welcome to join us for this discussion, during which we'll be providing some basic information about the race, followed by an opportunity for anyone to ask whatever questions they have. We'll be providing the IP for the TeamSpeak session on Monday morning.

As a reminder, this year's race will begin on 21 February. The Special Rules for the race will be made public a few days prior.

2009 Start Date Announced - 21 February

30 November 2008

I'm happy to announce the start date for the 2009 RTW Race - 21 February. We've yet to zero in on a starting time, but will be working on that as we develop the rules specific to this year's race.

I know there's been some confusion about this, and I apologize. This will be the final date, and we'll work to be more definite, earlier, next year.

2008 RTW Race Results - Congratulations Team SOH

21 February 2008

It is my pleasure to announce the results of the 2008 RTW Race.

  1. Sim-Outhouse
  2. Avsim
  3. Flightsim

Congratulations to SOH, who have for the first time taken the "Tornado Trophy." This year's race was another very close contest. Congratulations to everyone who participated.

We welcome your feedback as we think about plans for next year.

Again, Congratulations!
Matt Smith
RTWR Executive Committee

Special Rule 11, Appeals Decisions, Duenna Error Policy

19 February 2008

Special Rule 11 - Removed

Special Rule 11 - concerning the 24 hour embargo following an aircraft crash - is stricken from the Special Rules for the 2008 race with immediate effect. Pilots currently under embargo are released.

The Executive Committee underestimated the amount of embargoes that would result from technical glitches rather than true crashes.

SOH Leg: VHHX - RPLB Appeal

Team Sim Outhouse's leg from VHHX to RPLB was appealed as lacking authentication. They were proactive in contacting the Executive Committee as soon as they realised that there was a problem, and after consultation they reflew the leg. Accordingly, no penalty will be assessed for this leg.

SOH Leg: RPLB - RPLU Appeal

Team Sim Outhouse's leg from RPLB to RPLU was appealed as lacking authentication. In this case they were not proactive in contacting us and only provided an alternate form of authentication only after quite a bit of time had elapsed. Since they did provide evidence that the leg took place in the end, we will not require them to refly it. However, because this evidence was so late in coming and the team was not forthcoming about the mishap, we have determined that a delay of 15 minutes on the next team SOH leg departure is needed to make up for the questionable authentication on this leg. This penalty should be served as soon as possible.

Duenna Error Policy - Clarification

There seems to be a great deal of confusion regarding what we expect if a Duenna error prevents you from authenticating your flight in the normal way. Although the Duenna is the only officially accepted way of authenticating a flight, all this means is that flights lacking Duenna authentication need to be appealed to the Executive Committee: it does not imply that if there is a Duenna error you must refly a leg. Neither, however, does it mean that you can ignore a Duenna issue and hope that no-one notices.

When a team has what they believe to be a good flight and what they believe to be a Duenna failure, they should document the case, bring it to public attention, and immediately notify the Race Officials directly. They should present any evidence that they can produce as to the flight's authenticity. Primarily, we would like to see screenshots of the Flight Analysis window, as we used to use this for authentication. Also acceptable are shots of tracking through Google Earth, screenshots of the simulator itself, and testimony of multiplayer pilots. If the evidence indicates a proper flight, the Race Officials will approve the flight and there will be no penalty. If the evidence indicates an unsuccessful flight, then the team may apply the Retrospective Wingman Transfer, or, alternatively the Committee will assign a proper penalty. For example, the penalty might require the team to re-fly the leg and/or assess an additional time penalty.

Keeping Track of Bonuses

17 February 2008

In an effort to ease the workload of our stalwart programming genius, Jared Smith, we're asking each team to keep track of their bonuses in an official bonus thread. A thread has been posted in each forum.

The pilot who scores the bonus is responsible for recording it via reply message to this thread (on team flights, the lead pilot may record for everyone, or each individual pilot may record, at the team's discretion). In the future, if a bonus is not recorded on the official bonus thread, it will not be counted.

Future bonus posts must include the following elements:

In this way we hope to keep a running tally of bonus hours for each team. Penalty hours will be recorded on our website. Jared may or may not put the bonus hours into the baton tracking system. If he does not, rest assured, they still count - the tracker is not the official race record, simply a useful tool for following the race.

Thanks for your co-operation on this issue. We recognise that this is an inconvenience, but we really want to be sure we aren't missing anything in tracking the race.

Rules Reminders and Clarifications, Appeals Decisions

17 February 2008

We have a number of reminders and clarifications to publish, as well as some decisions on appeals.

Keeping Track of Penalties and Appeals

In order to help us and you keep better track of pending appeals, appeals decisions, and penalties resulting from appeals, we have set up a table on the Follow the Race page that details the status of appeals.

Clarification on Wingmen and Penalties and Bonuses

An aircraft must carry the baton in order to earn a bonus, accrue a penalty, or otherwise have an effect on the race.  Wingmen who crash while not in possession of the baton do not have the 24-hour aircraft embargo applied, and wingmen who successfully complete cabin class flights but do not have the baton transferred to them do not earn cabin class bonuses.  If the baton is not transferred to a wingman, nothing that happens on the wingman flight matters.  (Note that it is still advantageous to complete the leg, in case something untoward is discovered with the lead pilot's leg.)

Shockwave Wings of Power P-47

Note that this aircraft is not (as configured by default) legal for the RTWR.  Its external tanks total 330 gallons - the maximum allowed is 300. The external tanks must be "commented out" of the aircraft.cfg.

"Gnoopey" P-47M - Center3 Tank

We are reviewing the configuration of external tanks on this aircraft.  We recommend that pilots "comment out" the Center3 tank to ensure that it is legal.

Reminder: 24-hour Embargoes

Please remember that if you crash and restart your leg, it needs to be in a new aircraft: you are embargoed from flying the same aircraft within 24 hours after crashing.

Sim-Outhouse Leg from CAP6 to CYQH

The baton pilot on this flight reported fluxuating frame rates and other anomalies he attributed to lag from flying online.  The baton was carried at an average speed of over 600 knots - a value impossible to legally obtain, despite a valid Duenna reading.  We have determined that this leg cannot be allowed to stand since it had to have been the beneficiary of a major computer error.  Given the valid Duenna reading and the forthrightness of Team SOH about this flight, we have decided to allow them to retroactively transfer the baton to their successfully-completed wingman flight free of the normal penalty for doing the transfer after the fact.  Thus we are asking them to delay their departure on their next leg for 48 minutes: 18 minutes is the difference between the time of the speeded-up flight and 30 minutes is the normal handicap for transferring the baton to the wingman.

In the future, if flights occur that are clearly outside the bounds of a realism, we ask teams to be proactive in transferring the baton at the time, if possible.  This said, we applaud the approach SOH took in bringing this issue to our attention rather than waiting for us to investigate.

Flightsim.com VHHX-RPLL-RPMR

Flightsim.com appealed to have the embargo on the P-51H for Andy   lifted, on the grounds that the flight was voluntarily aborted and was   not the result of a computer or aircraft crash.

Flightsim.com's assumption that Andy received the baton on the flight from VHHX-RPLL is in error. The forum posts #52 shows that Andy abandoned his wingman flight before forum post #53 where the baton was released for the flight. Therefore Andy did not "crash" the P-51 because he did not have the Baton.

Teams are cautioned - the baton can only be transferred via the forum. The transfer of the baton does not occur on the RTW Race Tracker.

Andy's subsequent flight RPLL-RPMR in the P-51 was valid and he is not embargoed from flying the P-51. The FlightSim team decision to abandon the enroute flight from RPMR and return and refly the RPLL-RPMR leg was unnecessary. Since it resulted in a two hour penalty to Flightsim.com's team, that is determined to be sufficient penalty for the use of an ineligible aircraft - the P-47N by Wings of Power.

However, had Andy actually received the baton on the forums, we could not uphold an appeal: we must have a consistent standard in   assessing the embargo.  Because there is no way to absolutely verify   what happened when a flight was aborted, we have to assume the worst.    This standard is applied to all teams in all cases.  We believe   consistency in ruling here is of paramount importance.

Though in the case of Maple_One whose RPMR-WAPP flight was abandoned to allow the team to return to RPLL to rectify the perceived invalid flight, he is not embargoed from flying the P-51.

2008 Rules Clarifications and Highlights

15 February 2008

Here are a number of notes that clarify or emphasize rules.

Route East-to-West.

The overall routing is E-W but occasionally you will find yourself flying north-south or even W-E. Any west to east directions during the actual route are okay as long as the general route goes around the world opposite of how all the teams have done for the past three years. We want you to cross the oceans in the following order: Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean. Of course, you can go around the edges, you don't actually have to use a corridor to cross the ocean.

Two Airports per Continent.

The General Rule requires that teams land at two airports, at least 500nm apart, on each continental landmass. The Special Rule requires landing in specific Countries/States. Both rules are in effect. Normally, fulfilling the Special Rule will fulfil the General Rule by accident. The only case that requires attention is Europe. Teams should be careful that they land at Luxembourg and that they land at two airports at least 500nm apart.

Subsonic/Supersonic Aircraft.

The single indicator of whether an aircraft is supersonic is the max_mach parameter in the aircraft.cfg file. If that number exceeds 1.00, the plane is not eligible. The Duenna records the max_mach as "Mmo".

Team Flights.

Teams may combine these with the Special Aircraft Requirement. But be sure to meet both mileage requirements, which are different. Participating pilots need not fly the same aircraft as the lead pilot or wingman.

Wild Card.

The wild card is now 1,750 nm in length and thus opens up strategic possibilities. Note that the aircraft must be propeller driven. No jets, but big turboprops are fine.

Kickoff.

Each team has as many Cessna Skyhawks as they desire. The flights are simultaneous. The team need not complete all the roundtrips - each one earns 15 minutes independent of the rest. The RTW portion of the race

Kickoff Authentication.

For the massive Kickoff, individual pilots should use the forums to post their Duenna authentication. (Only the text file is needed, not the jpg.) The Kickoff is our first live work with the system and we may have as many as 70 pilots in the air. Things may go wrong. (Teams, please assign someone to keep track and verify the legs.)

Take Off Sequence for Baton-holder and Wingman.

The rules do not require a particular sequence. But this year, let's have the Baton-holder (the lead pilot) take off first and then the wingman take off afterwards. That order should be manageable for pilots in audio or visual contact. The race tracker assumes that the first pilot who departs the last-scored airport is the lead pilot and that the second is the wingman. If there is a glitch, we can intervene manually but that will take time and effort to handle. So teams are strongly encouraged to sequence their departures "lead first, wingman second" whenever possible.

Posting and Authentication on Normal Racing Legs.

On normal racing legs, the new pilot posts "I have the Baton" on the team forum and that forum clock starts the timing. The leg ends when the baton-holder posts "The Baton is Free". The Duenna authentication will normally be automatically transmitted to the tracking server and when that is confirmed there is no more to do. (Teams might afterwards double-check that there are no errors.) Normally, if all is well, the baton-holder need not post the Duenna authentication.

Thus, the technology spirits willing, we distinguish between (a) monitoring the baton and timing the legs on the forum, and (b) leg authentication on the tracker.

When there is a problem, the baton-holder posts his full authentication on the forum. The may be the complete Duenna output or it may have to be a Flight Analysis screenshot. In either case, a quick explanation would help the race officials sort out what happened.

2008 Race NOTAMs

14 February 2008

AFCAD Files.

Reggie Fields has been kind enough to put together a set of AFCAD files for key airports in the 2008 RTW Race. They may be downloaded from the Resources page

Aircraft Restrictions (new for 2008).

Airport Designator Changes.

There are substantial changes in airport designators between all FS versions. The FS2004 and FSX changes may have the most impact due to the government decision to redesignate the majority of airports in Indonesia. The following list of 59 airports and the FS2004 and FSX designators is provided to minimize confusion. There are about 1,040 total airports which have different designators in FSX than in FS2004.

Teams are asked to note FS version and BOTH designators if one of the airports is used. Using only one designator may preclude team pilots from being able to locate the baton or planned route.

FS2004

 

FSX

 

Airport

City

Country

WA0A

 

WA1A

 

Sorong Mainland

Sorong Mainland

Indonesia

WA0E

 

WA1B

 

Aru

Aru

Indonesia

WA0J

 

WALV

 

Bunyu

Bunyu

Indonesia

WAAM

 

WAWM

 

Andi Jemma

Andi Jemma

Indonesia

WAAS

 

WAWS

 

Soroako

Soroako

Indonesia

WAAT

 

WAWT

 

Pongtiku

Pongtiku

Indonesia

WAAU

 

WAWW

 

Wolter Monginsidi

Kendari

Indonesia

WI0C

 

WI1A

 

Nusawiru

Nusawiru

Indonesia

WI0D

 

WI1B

 

Batujajar

Batujajar

Indonesia

WI0F

 

WI1C

 

Rumpin

Rumpin

Indonesia

WI0I

 

WIPO

 

Gatot Subrato

Gatot Subrato

Indonesia

WIAA

 

WITN

 

Maimum Saleh

Sabang

Indonesia

WIAM

 

WICM

 

Cibeureum

Cibeureum

Indonesia

WIAR

 

WARI

 

Iswahyudi

Madiun

Indonesia

WIAS

 

WARA

 

Abdulrachman Saleh Aero

Malang

Indonesia

WIIA

 

WICB

 

Budiarto

Tangerang

Indonesia

WIIB

 

WICC

 

Husein Sastranegara

Bandung

Indonesia

WIIC

 

WICD

 

Penggung

Penggung

Indonesia

WIIH

 

WIHH

 

Halim Intl

Jakarta

Indonesia

WIIJ

 

WARJ

 

Adisutjipto

Yogyakarta

Indonesia

WIIL

 

WIHL

 

Tunggul Wulung

Cilacap

Indonesia

WIIP

 

WIHP

 

Pondok Cabe

Pondok Cabe

Indonesia

WIIS

 

WARS

 

Achmad Yani

Semarang

Indonesia

WIIT

 

WICT

 

Radin Inten Ii Apt

Bandar Lampung

Indonesia

WIKB

 

WIDD

 

Hang Nadim

Batam

Indonesia

WIKD

 

WIOD

 

H.A.S. Hanandjoeddin

Tanjung Pandan

Indonesia

WIKG

 

WIDE

 

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Pasir Pangaraan

Pasir Pangaraan

Indonesia

WIKK

 

WIPK

 

Depati Amir

Depati Amir

Indonesia

WIKM

 

WIOM

 

Tarempa

Tarempa

Indonesia

WIKN

 

WIDN

 

Kijang

Tanjung Pinang

Indonesia

WIKS

 

WIDS

 

Dabo

Singkep

Indonesia

WR0B

 

WALX

 

Mangkajang

Mangkajang

Indonesia

WR0G

 

WA19

 

Pagerungan

Pagerungan

Indonesia

WR0H

 

WALQ

 

Muara Badak Pujangan

Muara Badak Pujangan

Indonesia

WRBB

 

WAOO

 

Syamsudin Noor

Banjarmasin

Indonesia

WRBC

 

WAOC

 

Batu Licin

Batu Licin

Indonesia

WRBI

 

WAOI

 

Iskandar

Pangkalanbun

Indonesia

WRBN

 

WAON

 

Warukin

Warukin

Indonesia

WRBP

 

WAOP

 

Tjilik Riwut

Palangkaraya

Indonesia

WRBS

 

WAOS

 

Hasan

Hasan

Indonesia

WRKC

 

WATC

 

Wai Oti

Maumere

Indonesia

WRKE

 

WATE

 

H Hasan Aroeboesman

H Hasan Aroeboesman

Indonesia

WRKG

 

WATG

 

Satartacik

Satartacik

Indonesia

WRKK

 

WATT

 

El Tari

Kupang

Indonesia

WRKO

 

WATO

 

Mutiara Ii

Mutiara Ii

Indonesia

WRKT

 

WATM

 

Mali

Mali

Indonesia

WRLK

 

WALK

 

Kalimaru

Kalimaru

Indonesia

WRLL

 

WALL

 

Sepinggan

Balikpapan

Indonesia

WRLR

 

WALR

 

Tarakan

Tarakan

Indonesia

WRLS

 

WALS

 

Temindung

Temindung

Indonesia

WRLT

 

WALT

 

Tanjung Santan

Tanjung Santan

Indonesia

WRRA

 

WADA

 

Selaparang

Mataram

Indonesia

WRRB

 

WADB

 

Mohammad Salahuddin

Bima

Indonesia

WRRR

 

WADD

 

Bali Intl

Den Pasar

Indonesia

WRRS

 

WADS

 

Sumbawa Besar

Sumbawa

Indonesia

WRRT

 

WADT

 

Tambolaka

Tambolaka

Indonesia

WRRW

 

WADW

 

Mau Hau

Waingapu

Indonesia

WRSJ

 

WARR

 

Juanda

Surabaya

Indonesia

WRSQ

 

WARQ

 

Adi Sumarmo Wiryokusumo

Solo

Indonesia


Moved Airports

The following designators are used in FS2004 and in FSX but are NOT used for the same airports:

E16 - FS2004 - Leland, Illinois, US (airport not in FSX)
E16 - FSX - South County of Santa Clara, San Martin, California, US

F37 - FS2004 - Wauchula Municipal, Wauchula, Florida, US (KCHN in FSX)
F37 - FSX - Carrizozo Municipal, Carrizozo, New Mexico, US

T80 - FS2004 - Kleberg County, Kingsville, Texas, US (KIKG in FSX)
T80 - FSX - Bishop's Landing, Celina, Texas, US

S37 - FS2004 - Clover Park Technical College, Tacoma, Washington, US (SXX in FSX)
S37 - FSX - Smoketown, Pennsylvania, US

SBMG - FS2004 - Maringa, Maringa, Brazil (airport not in FSX)
SBMG - FSX - Regional De Maringa, Maringa, Brazil (SBMH in FS2004)

FAPP - FS2004 - Potgietersrus, South Africa
FAPP - FSX - Polokwane, International, Polokwane, South Africa (FAPB - Pietersburg in FS2004)

ZGGG - this airport is in both FSX and FS2004 - however it is NOT the same airport. The new airports was constructed too late to be in FS2004 - though Jan Martin produced a nice addon scenery for the airport. The old airport was closed so that is not included in FSX - even as a closed airport. If a team uses this airport, the landing and takeoff must be in the same version of FS.

2008 Special Rules and Routing Posted

14 February 2008

We have now posted the 2008 Special Rules and Routing on the Rules section of this website. The their associated FAQ will be posted later this evening. As a reminder, the race begins this Saturday (16 February) at 1130 EDT, 1630Z.

General Rules Updates

14 February 2008

A few updates have been made to the General Rules. They are:

RTW Duenna Updated, Race Tracking in Testing

Tuesday 12 February 2008

In a collaborative effort from two people to whom the Race community owes a great debt of gratitude, the RTW Duenna has been updated for the 2008 Race. John Muller and Jared Smith, who have both been indispensable in orchestrating the technical aspects of the race in the past, have once again outdone themselves for the benefit of everyone involved with the race. This latest update brings several refinements to the Duenna's ability to verify flights, and will give each leg of this year's race a redoubtable mantle of credibility and verifiability. Our hope, as it has ever been with the Duenna, is to enable competitors and spectators alike to focus on the race itself, rather than the mechanics behind it.

Perhaps the most exciting news to come from our two technical wizards, however, is that a system for automatically tracking race pilots as they fly around the world has been put into place, and is currently in testing. Although the bugs are still very much in the process of being worked out, it is our hope that when the race begins in a few days' time, we will have the most robust and capable system for following the race that we have ever had in place on the "Follow the Race" page of our website (http://www.fsrtwrace.com/follow.htm).

At this time, we would like to invite pilots to download the latest testing version of the Duenna. We encourage everyone to put their computers, the Duenna, and our tracking system through their respective paces. The greater the number of practice legs flown with the Duenna, the greater the chance that bugs will be caught before the race. (To say nothing of the racing benefit to practicing!)

Thanks again for your time, and for your testing. We'll see you on race day!

More Cabin Class News

Tuesday 12 February 2008

After listening to comments and suggestions, we've tweaked the upcoming Cabin Class rule in these two ways.

First, the Cabin Class Handicap is now 20 minutes (rather than 15 minutes) per leg. Note that this makes the faster Cabin Class aircraft roughly competitive with the P-38L and P-51D, but not the Hornet or P-47M, over a 500nm leg. Still in place is the limit of 12 legs to which such handicap credits may be applied.

Second, in response to pilots' suggestions we have added two aircraft to the qualified list.

(a) Rockwell Turbo Commander 690A by Veneaviones. Available many places, including AVSIM.

(b) Douglas A-26 Invader by the SOH Collaborative Team. (Preferably the On Mark Marksman executive version. But any SOH A-26 will qualify.) Available at Sim-Outhouse (Look for John Terrell, that is Bomber_12th. There are many possible updates, but the basic model works well):

Manual Installation

Automatic Installer

The "On Mark Marksman" executive version (requires the A-26 Invader installed first) at AVSIM or SOH.

Both aircraft are widely acclaimed. Both are freeware.

Important Pre-Race Information for 2008

Tuesday 12 February 2008

The Executive Committee has been and remains hard at work preparing the rules for the 2008 race, which, as we have announced, will be starting in just a few weeks. We wanted to take this opportunity to pass along some information about this year's race that we feel will be valuable for you to know now, as it will affect your preparations.

The first item I wanted to share is that the Duenna will be the only way to authenticate a flight this year. The Duenna gives the race community greater confidence in the compliance of other racers with the rules, because it makes transparent a number of details about race legs that are not apparent from screenshots of the Flight Analysis window alone. This assurance of legitimacy is an especially important part of the race: we believe that knowing with confidence that everyone is following the rules fully will greatly increase the general enjoyability of the race for all pilots. Last year, most flights were authenticated with the Duenna, so it is our belief that this won't be a large change from the way we've done things before. This being said, we wanted to get the word out so that everyone could begin practicing appropriately. As a reminder, the Duenna may be found by visiting the "Resources" section of the official RTWR website, at www.fsrtwrace.com.

Secondly, I would like to briefly discuss some rules changes regarding aircraft. Darwin has smiled on the RTWR as it has grown: a field of aircraft that was once very wide has been narrowed by natural selection to include only the fastest. And this is as it should be: we are, after all, in the business of racing. This having been said, concerns have been raised in the community about the dominance of only a few airplanes: a wider variety gives individual pilots a greater choice and, in addition, widens the field of pilots who are able to comfortably fly in the race. For the 2008 race, we are going to have three small incentives to make it profitable for teams to fly a wider variety of aircraft. First, aircraft flown for more than 20 legs will need to have "maintenance" performed on them that will delay the transfer of the baton for fifteen minutes on every leg beyond the 20th. This maintenance will necessitate disabling the autopilot on these aircraft for the 21st and subsequent legs. Secondly, we are offering a time bonus of 30 minutes, to a maximum of 5 hours, for each different aircraft in which a team flies 3 or more legs. Finally, a fleet of "Cabin Class" general aviation aircraft will be available with which to fly influential people interested in following the race along race legs. On legs in these aircraft greater than 300nm, a time bonus of 15 minutes will be given. This handicap is available for up to 12 legs. The "Cabin Class" aircraft available are:

The exact wording of these rules will be made public 24 hours before the race. For now, we simply wanted to provide a heads-up so that teams have an idea of what to expect and can make preparations.

Finally, I'd like to note that the "pilot reports" that were experimented with last year are to become a permanent part of the race.

These brief summaries of the events of race legs, sometimes accompanied by a screenshot, greatly enhance the enjoyment of spectators to the race. It remains our goal to have at least half of race legs documented with a pilot report.

Our hope, as always, is to maximize the enjoyment of the race for all its participants. In instituting these rules (especially the rules concerning aircraft variety) we have tried to be as light-handed as possible. It is our hope that the aircraft variety rules will expand, rather than restrict, the freedom of race pilots - by making a wider variety of aircraft competitive, while still allowing the tested and proved speed demons of past races their place of honor at the head of each team's fleet.

As always, you can find this news item and all other race updates and news at the official website of the race, www.fsrtwrace.com.

Thanks for your attention and best of luck in your preparations. We look forward to seeing you (virtually) on race day!

2008 Race Start Date Announced, Website Updated

Tuesday 1 January 2008

The 2008 Flight Simulator Around-The-World Race will begin on February 16 at 1130EDT/1630Z. Special rules for the race will be posted 24 hours the start. Any modifications to the general rules will be made public as soon as they are decided upon. The RTW website has been updated to be fully current.

2007 Race Blog

Wednesday 21 February 2007

Click here to access the 2007 RTW blog.

Winner Declared - Flightsim.com!

Wednesday 21 February 2007

In what will likely be recognized as the most closely contested and exciting RTW race yet, Flightsim.com today edged out Avsim.com and Sim-Outhouse.com to take the "Tornado Trophy" for 2007. A detailed "Race Journal" will be put together chronicling the events of this year's race - check back here to get it when it's released. Until then, congratulations are due all the teams and pilots in this year's race. We'll see you in 2008!

Attack on Flightsim.com Teamspeak Server

Sunday, 18 February 2007

On the evening of Saturday 17 February Flightsim.com's teamspeak server experienced a malicious attack from an unknown party or parties. The Executive Committee is investigating this event and doing everything it can to bring those responsible to justice, and we request that anyone with any information on the attack to step forward - all information will be kept in strictest confidence.

This sort of behavior is absolutely unacceptable - nothing is more contrary to the spirit of the race - and indeed the spirit of Honor itself. We wish to condemn those responsible in the strongest possible terms. It is our hope that this was merely a random attack from someone unassociated with the race; the idea that someone involved with this event would sink to this level is unthinkable. We don't wish to point any accusing fingers in the direction of the other teams, and it is our hope withal that this unfortunate event won't tarnish the remainder of the race.

2007 Special Rules and Routing Released

Friday, 16 February 2007

The Special Rules and Routing for the 2007 Race have been released and may be seen on the Official Rules page of this site. Additionally, the Rules FAQ has been updated, and a NOTAM released with helpful race information.

UPDATE: A corridor through Siberia was left off the initial rules release. The rules have been updated to include this corridor.
FURTHER UPDATE: We've released NOTAMs clarifying aircraft eligibility in corridors and the specifics of inland waterways. Additionally, AFCAD files with lighting and additional parking for key RTWR airports have been uploaded, courtesy of Reggie Fields, and are available here.

NOTAMs for the 2007 Race:

Last Update: Saturday, 17 February 2007

Clarification of Inland Waterways

The Suez and Panama Canals are considered inland waterways, as is any body of water separated from the ocean by a dike or dam in FS.

Aircraft Eligibility in Corridor Flights

We wish to clarify (and liberalize) the rule on aircraft eligibility for the long Corridor flights of over 1,500 nm. Pilots may choose any subsonic airliner/cargo aircraft. We shall also allow military equivalents that are derived from (or very similar to) airliner/cargo aircraft. Equally, we shall allow business jets whose range and speed are realistically modeled. In any case, no such military or business jet aircraft may gain a competitive advantage over the airliner/cargo "gold standard" of the default Boeing B747-400. Of particular concern are models of military aircraft whose real world performance is classified and whose FS model performance is based on estimates. In particular, allowable aircraft include the AC-130, P-3C Orion, KC-135, Tu-95 "Bear", Gulfstream G500/V and Citation X business jet. (These are aircraft types. Suitability is subject to realistic FS modeling, of course.)

ICAO/Designator Changes between FS versions.

There are substantial changes in airport designators between all FS versions. The FS2004 and FSX changes may have the most impact due to the government decision to redesignate the majority of airports in Indonesia. The following list of 59 airports and the FS2004 and FSX designators is provided to minimize confusion. There are about 1,040 total airports which have different designators in FSX than in FS2004.

Teams are asked to note FS version and BOTH designators if one of the airports is used. Using only one designator may preclude team pilots from being able to locate the baton or planned route.

FS2004

FSX

Airport

City

Country

WA0A

WA1A

Sorong Mainland

Sorong Mainland

Indonesia

WA0E

WA1B

Aru

Aru

Indonesia

WA0J

WALV

Bunyu

Bunyu

Indonesia

WAAM

WAWM

Andi Jemma

Andi Jemma

Indonesia

WAAS

WAWS

Soroako

Soroako

Indonesia

WAAT

WAWT

Pongtiku

Pongtiku

Indonesia

WAAU

WAWW

Wolter Monginsidi

Kendari

Indonesia

WI0C

WI1A

Nusawiru

Nusawiru

Indonesia

WI0D

WI1B

Batujajar

Batujajar

Indonesia

WI0F

WI1C

Rumpin

Rumpin

Indonesia

WI0I

WIPO

Gatot Subrato

Gatot Subrato

Indonesia

WIAA

WITN

Maimum Saleh

Sabang

Indonesia

WIAM

WICM

Cibeureum

Cibeureum

Indonesia

WIAR

WARI

Iswahyudi

Madiun

Indonesia

WIAS

WARA

Abdulrachman Saleh Aero

Malang

Indonesia

WIIA

WICB

Budiarto

Tangerang

Indonesia

WIIB

WICC

Husein Sastranegara

Bandung

Indonesia

WIIC

WICD

Penggung

Penggung

Indonesia

WIIH

WIHH

Halim Intl

Jakarta

Indonesia

WIIJ

WARJ

Adisutjipto

Yogyakarta

Indonesia

WIIL

WIHL

Tunggul Wulung

Cilacap

Indonesia

WIIP

WIHP

Pondok Cabe

Pondok Cabe

Indonesia

WIIS

WARS

Achmad Yani

Semarang

Indonesia

WIIT

WICT

Radin Inten Ii Apt

Bandar Lampung

Indonesia

WIKB

WIDD

Hang Nadim

Batam

Indonesia

WIKD

WIOD

H.A.S. Hanandjoeddin

Tanjung Pandan

Indonesia

WIKG

WIDE

Pasir Pangaraan

Pasir Pangaraan

Indonesia

WIKK

WIPK

Depati Amir

Depati Amir

Indonesia

WIKM

WIOM

Tarempa

Tarempa

Indonesia

WIKN

WIDN

Kijang

Tanjung Pinang

Indonesia

WIKS

WIDS

Dabo

Singkep

Indonesia

WR0B

WALX

Mangkajang

Mangkajang

Indonesia

WR0G

WA19

Pagerungan

Pagerungan

Indonesia

WR0H

WALQ

Muara Badak Pujangan

Muara Badak Pujangan

Indonesia

WRBB

WAOO

Syamsudin Noor

Banjarmasin

Indonesia

WRBC

WAOC

Batu Licin

Batu Licin

Indonesia

WRBI

WAOI

Iskandar

Pangkalanbun

Indonesia

WRBN

WAON

Warukin

Warukin

Indonesia

WRBP

WAOP

Tjilik Riwut

Palangkaraya

Indonesia

WRBS

WAOS

Hasan

Hasan

Indonesia

WRKC

WATC

Wai Oti

Maumere

Indonesia

WRKE

WATE

H Hasan Aroeboesman

H Hasan Aroeboesman

Indonesia

WRKG

WATG

Satartacik

Satartacik

Indonesia

WRKK

WATT

El Tari

Kupang

Indonesia

WRKO

WATO

Mutiara Ii

Mutiara Ii

Indonesia

WRKT

WATM

Mali

Mali

Indonesia

WRLK

WALK

Kalimaru

Kalimaru

Indonesia

WRLL

WALL

Sepinggan

Balikpapan

Indonesia

WRLR

WALR

Tarakan

Tarakan

Indonesia

WRLS

WALS

Temindung

Temindung

Indonesia

WRLT

WALT

Tanjung Santan

Tanjung Santan

Indonesia

WRRA

WADA

Selaparang

Mataram

Indonesia

WRRB

WADB

Mohammad Salahuddin

Bima

Indonesia

WRRR

WADD

Bali Intl

Den Pasar

Indonesia

WRRS

WADS

Sumbawa Besar

Sumbawa

Indonesia

WRRT

WADT

Tambolaka

Tambolaka

Indonesia

WRRW

WADW

Mau Hau

Waingapu

Indonesia

WRSJ

WARR

Juanda

Surabaya

Indonesia

WRSQ

WARQ

Adi Sumarmo Wiryokusumo

Solo

Indonesia


Moved Airports.

The following designators are used in FS2004 and in FSX but are NOT used for the same airports:

E16 – FS2004 – Leland, Illinois, US (airport not in FSX)
E16 – FSX – South County of Santa Clara, San Martin, California, US

F37 – FS2004 – Wauchula Municipal, Wauchula, Florida, US (KCHN in FSX)
F37 – FSX – Carrizozo Municipal, Carrizozo, New Mexico, US

T80 – FS2004 – Kleberg County, Kingsville, Texas, US (KIKG in FSX)
T80 – FSX – Bishop’s Landing, Celina, Texas, US

S37 – FS2004 – Clover Park Technical College, Tacoma, Washington, US (SXX in FSX)
S37 – FSX – Smoketown, Pennsylvania, US

SBMG – FS2004 – Maringa, Maringa, Brazil (airport not in FSX)
SBMG – FSX – Regional De Maringa, Maringa, Brazil (SBMH in FS2004)

FAPP – FS2004 – Potgietersrus, South Africa
FAPP – FSX – Polokwane, International, Polokwane, South Africa (FAPB – Pietersburg in FS2004)

ZGGG – this airport is in both FSX and FS2004 – however it is NOT the same airport. The new airports was constructed too late to be in FS2004 – though Jan Martin produced a nice addon scenery for the airport. The old airport was closed so that is not included in FSX – even as a closed airport. If a team uses this airport – the landing and takeoff must be in the same version of FS.

3000M Airports.

These airports have official FS elevations above 3000M – add on airports (Tibet) are not eligible to meet this requirement. If a team should feel they have identified another airport which meets this criteria – they should contact the Executive Committee immediately so the BGL code can be researched.

Africa

Lesotho

FXLT

Asia

India

VI1E (Z13Q – FS2002 / VI57 – FSX)

Asia

India

VILH

Asia

India

VI1M (not in FS2002 / VI66 – FSX)

Asia

Tajikistan

TJ0E (not in FS2002 / UT44 – FSX)

North America

USA

77CO

North America

USA

KLXV

South America

Argentina

SASQ

South America

Bolivia

SLLJ

South America

Bolivia

SLOR

South America

Bolivia

SLCC

South America

Bolivia

SLPO

South America

Bolivia

SLLP

South America

Bolivia

SLCN

South America

Chile

SCKP

South America

Peru

SPZO

South America

Peru

SPJJ

South America

Peru

SPHY

South America

Peru

SPJL

South America

Peru

SPIY

South America

Peru

SPNP

South America

Peru

SPVI

South America

Peru

SPRF

(VNLK – Lukla has an elevation of 3048m/ 10,000ft in FSX. This is not correct and this airport in FSX is not eligible to meet this requirement)


Below Sea Level Airports.

The following airports have official FS elevations below sea level and are eligible to meet the requirement. If a team should feel they have identified another airport which meets this criteria – they should contact the Executive Committee immediately so the BGL code can be researched.

Africa

Egypt

HE0B (Z09K in FS2002 / HE11 in FSX)

Africa

Egypt

HEAX

Asia

Azerbaijan

UB0E (not in FS2002 / UB14 in FSX)

Asia

Azerbaijan

UB0C (not in FS2002 / UB12 in FSX)

Asia

Iran

OINJ

Asia

Iran

OINR

Asia

Iran

OI0R (OI1C in FSX / Z14W in FS2002 not eligible)

Asia

Iran

OINN

Asia

Iran

OIGG

Asia

Israel

LLMZ

Asia

Israel

LLEY

Asia

Kazakhstan

UATG

Asia

Russia

URWA

Asia

Turkmenistan

UT1J – in FSX only

Asia

Turkmenistan

TM0B (not in FS2002 / UT1F in FSX)

Europe

Denmark

EKAE

Europe

Denmark

EKMN

Europe

Denmark

EKNS

Europe

Greece

LGEP

Europe

Netherlands

EHRD

Europe

Netherlands

EHLE

Europe

Netherlands

EHNP

Europe

Netherlands

EHAM

North America

USA

L06

North America

USA

KCLR

North America

USA

KBWC

North America

USA

KTRM

North America

USA

59CL (L03 – FS2002)

North America

USA

KSAS

North America

USA

KIPL

North America

USA

KNJK

North America

USA

61CL (6L1 in FS2002)

Oceania

Papua New Guinea

ESA

Oceania

Papua New Guinea

GPA

Aircraft Eligibility.

Each year the Committee must consider which aircraft are eligible for the Round the World Race. Our basic principles are "fun and fair" in that we want people to fly their favorite aircraft and that the process be fair for everyone. In addition, we stress realism to the extent that the race is still fun and fair.

During the Race, the Committee will consider challenges. If you feel that an aircraft is not eligible for the race, you should submit a challenge. You should state your objection and include any relevant documentation. Others will have a chance to respond quickly. The Committee will take appropriate action.

Here are some decisions made before the Race begins.

AIRCRAFT TYPES NEWLY ELIGIBLE IN 2007:

V-22 Osprey.
Finally, enough examples in active service. Hooray!
Rob Barendregt's VTOL gauge is not legal in 2007.

AIRCRAFT TYPES NOT ELIGIBLE IN 2007:

The F2G (Goodyear's last version of the F4U Corsair).
Ten were put in service, but those were in testing at Patuxent NAS and found deficient in handling--and decommissioned within two years. Its fame lies in low-level circuit racing.)

Fw 190-D11 and Ta 152C.
The D-11 is labeled as a prototype by Shockwave in their documentation. Apparently 7-13 were built (Shockwave says 7) but we don't know much for sure here--this being a late-war on-the-fly aircraft. The TA 152C is a prototype. (The Fw 190-D9, Fw 190-D13, and the Ta 152H are fine.)

Pilatus PC-21
There are not yet 10 examples in active service.

AIRCRAFT MODELS NOT ELIGIBLE IN 2007:

The decisions here do not necessarily reflect on the overall quality of any aircraft model. The design of FS aircraft necessarily involves many compromises. Understandably, many designers choose not to design for performance right at the edge of the flight envelope. But that is where the Race is run. So we shall be in a position of finding some aircraft unsuitable for RTW Race even if they are otherwise excellent aircraft. And, of course, reasonable performance at the edge does not necessarily recommend the aircraft for other purposes.  In all instances we endeavor to arrive at a solution that allows pilots to fly their favorite aircraft while not giving anyone an unrealistic advantage.  We arrive at our decisions after thorough flight testing and having consulted as many knowledgeable people as we realistically can.
For clarification, there are three primary areas of concern for the RTW Race.  We shall term them, for simplicity, power, speed, and fuel economy.  Power refers to the speed an aircraft can maintain in level flight – this comes from the power of its engines – and is our primary concern when considering aircraft eligibility.  Speed refers to the maximum airframe structural speed – the speed at which the aircraft overstresses or encounters compressibility.  Finally, fuel economy refers to how quickly an aircraft burns fuel.  Our primary concern with fuel economy is the range of an aircraft: we aren't too concerned about people being able to take out fuel to reduce weight, as this doesn't normally impact the race in a significant manner.  The most important of these criteria is 'power' as this most significantly affects what an aircraft can do in a race.  Extreme cases involving speed and fuel economy will be considered, however we will generally allow for some leeway on these.

Lockheed Constellation L-1049G. (Mike Stone and Rey Lopez models.)
Various reasons having to do with unrealistic power, speed, and fuel economy.

Constellation pilots should use the Mike Stone visual model with the Wolfram Beckert airfile (and the Hansjoerg Naegele-Jan Visser panel). Look for vcon20.zip and follow the instructions carefully. A complete package of 3D model, airfile, panel, and sound is available at FlightSim.com. Look for Luis da Costa Pereira as the compiler of the packages for the L-1049G and EC-121.

ATR72 (ARNZ) Jon Murchison.
This ATR72 is 100+ kts too fast. There exist lots of realistic alternatives. For freeware, look for the excellent version by Francisco Sanchez-Casataner. The FlightOne payware version is a real favorite.

BSMP Saab 2000 (Blue-Sky Mine Productions)
A well-known model. But for racing purposes, too powerful and too high a sustained speed—by a long shot.

Beech Starship (Mike Stone original and Alaskan Winds modification)
Beech Starship (John B. Loney)
These aircraft is not eligible at this time. The flight dynamics produce unrealistic speeds and range. No other Starship model has been submitted for consideration/validation.

Models by Kazunori Ito (several):
Kazunori Ito is known for his outstanding 3d modeling and painting skills. However, our experience with his flight models indicates that they are not suitable for RTW Racing.

The one exception is the Kazunori Ito P-82 which can be flown when coupled with the special aerodynamic package provided by Tom Falley (fliger747) of Sim-Outhouse. You can download it from the Sim-Outhouse archives by looking under "fliger747" or going directly here:
http://www.sim-outhouse.com/index.php?lloc=downloads&loc=downloads&page=info&FileID=8303 


APPEALS FINDINGS FROM PREVIOUS YEARS:

The FSD Piaggio Avanti may be flown without any modification.  Though its 'speed' as measured by descending flight was high, its 'power' as measured in level flight was not, and we therefore find it suitable for the race.
The Tom “Gnoopey” Kohler P-47 is eligible for the race.  Its 'power' as measured by level flight performance in standard atmospheric conditions was extremely close to the best known values for the real aircraft.  Its 'speed,' as measured by dive performance, was higher than our best value, however we don't find this a significant enough reason to disqualify it.
We faced essentially the same dilemma with these two aircraft.  Both aircraft performed 'hot' in descents, but both were realistic in cruise.  Given that the advantage one can gain from a rapid descent is relatively small we've decided to allow both of these aircraft unmodified in the race.

2007 APPEALS FINDINGS:

Alpha Simulations DH Hornet
This aircraft is physically modeled with wing tanks on the naval version, but not in the other versions. The aerodynamics use the same airfile and aircraft.cfg and perform identically. Thus, the differences are merely cosmetic. The aircraft is also too fast by a margin larger than we would prefer. However, there are also several other aircraft with maximum speeds similarly above the margin: for this year we shall give the over-ambitious airspeed modeling a pass. Hence, for 2007 all versions of the AlphaSim Hornet are eligible.

Shockwave Wings of Power P-51H
The P-51H relied on an ADI system to dampen the danger of detonation when the engine was run at high manifold pressures. But that ADI was time-limited by the amount of liquid available. Shockwave has not modeled that time-limitation into the simulation. Thus, while the P-51H has a maximum speed that is almost exactly right, the FS model can fly at that speed for much longer than could the actual aircraft. The difficulty is that this "violation" of reality—aircraft able to maintain maximum speed only for limited times—is widely shared by many aircraft. And there is no reliable and uniform standard for making corrections. (The exact same problem applies to the other P-51H, the Do-335, several late-model P-47s, the Howard 500, and most of the complex high power piston engines of the post war period. A different version of the same problem exists with many other high performance aircraft.) These are matters for future work. For 2007, the Shockwave P-51H is eligible.

Tom "Gnoopey" Kohler RB-50F
This aircraft model was made public 24 hours after the deadline. (The race starts at 1500UTC on February 17, making the deadline 1500UTC on February 3. While beta versions were available earlier, the release model was not available in time. The purpose of the rule is to allow all the race participants to examine all new aircraft, to judge the performance under race conditions, and make an overall assessment.) Thus, this aircraft needs a decision. This matter is especially sensitive because the author is one of "our own"—a racer. Naturally enough, we want to be very careful with designs that might be crafted for RTWR purposes. And the matter becomes acute when the submission is late. However, other than the deadline's being missed, things look in order. The aircraft dynamics seem to be within the bounds of our normal criteria (though see the P-51H ruling above). Further, the author made the aircraft available at all the major sites. And he also made publicly available the aircraft performance data so that the teams might judge its suitability well before the race start. Thus, the RB-50F is eligible.

Small Change Made to Pilot Eligibilty Rule

Friday, 9 Febrary 2007

In response to community requests, the RTWR Executive Committee has made a modification to the General Rules pertaining to pilot eligibility. We've updated the rule to allow pilots and teams more flexibility, getting rid of the previous two-hour embargo on flights and inserting the following in its place:

"A pilot may claim the baton when it is released or transferred by another pilot. However, no pilot may advance the baton in consecutive legs."

The rules page as well as the FAQ have been updated to reflect this change.

RTW-Duenna Updated for 2007

Friday, 9 February 2007

Johannes Muller has once again come through for the race community - the RTW-Duenna tracking software has been updated to be fully compatible with this year's race and FSX. It may be downloaded here. Our deepest thanks go out to Johannes for once again providing us with this great tool!

Updates to General Rules and Charter for the 2007 Race Released

Sunday, 4 February 2007:

The General Rules and Charter have been updated for the 2007 race.  See the Official Rules page to examine the new rules, or take a look at the Rules FAQ section for a detailed explanation of some of their finer points.

2007 Race Officially Announced, Teams Invited

I am pleased to announce on the behalf of the Executive Committee of the Flight Simulator Around-The-World Race that the Race's fifth running will begin at 10 AM, U.S. Eastern Time (1500Z) on Saturday, February 17th, 2007.  It is also my pleasure to formally invite Avsim.com, Flightsim.com, and Sim-Outhouse.com to compete in this year's race.

The race's website (http://users.adelphia.net/~mattsmith19/RTW/) will soon be updated with this year's General Rules.  In the meantime, I am able to confirm all of the following about this year's race:
We hope to release the General Rules, governing the mechanics of the race, within the next week.  The Special Rules and Routing for this year's race, including ocean crossing corridors, special bonuses, and a special race start event, will be made public 24 hours before the start of the race.

Each website has set up a forum for their team.  Their URLs are as follows:
Avsim.com: http://forums.avsim.net/dcboard.php?az=show_topics&forum=227
Flightsim.com: http://forums.flightsim.com/dc/dcboard.php?az=show_topics&forum=11
Sim-Outhouse.com: http://www.sim-outhouse.com/sohforums/forumdisplay.php?f=6

Pilots interested in racing should visit one of the above forums to join in on team discussion and practice sessions.

The Executive Committee of the race remains open to suggestions as we refine the routing and rules for this year’s race.  We may be contacted through the race website.

Best of luck to each of the three teams on race preparations!

2006 Race Results Announced - Avsim.com Wins!


The Executive Committee is pleased to (finally!) officially announce the results of the 2006 RTW Race.  Avsim.com took first place, bringing the Tornado Trophy back to their headquarters.  Flightsim.com took second place and Sim-outhouse.com took third with valiant efforts from both teams.  We've always believed that the RTW Race brings out the best in the Flightsim community, and this was certainly true this year.  To everyone who participated in the race in any capacity this year, we want to extend our deepest thanks.  It's been wonderful to see everyone's enthusiasm and enjoyment.

A large number of memorable moments occurred during this year's race, however I wanted to highlight just a few.  They're represent what we're shooting for in administering the race.  First, I want to give a shout out to the rookies who did their first serious flying in this year's race.  I remember hearing of a number of times when these people played a major role in the race, and after taking part hearing that they had the thrill of their simming lives.  This is just wonderful.  Secondly, I wanted to highlight all the times when pilots - rookies and veterans alike - faced serious flying challenges.  Our routing team - Mike MacKuen and Reggie Fields - truly worked overtime to put a routing package together to create a large number of these moments.  It seems that they succeeded.  Finally, I remember reading on one of the forums someone describing the race as "the best flightsimming has to offer," or something similar.  I don't know about the truth of this statement, but it's been the thrill of my life to hear someone describe the race this way.  I couldn't be happier!

The race wouldn't have happened without the absolutely titanic effort put forth by a large number of people behind the scenes.  I'm not going to list them here for fear of omitting anyone, however the group is large and they all deserve the profound gratitude of the community.  From a personal standpoint, as the fellow trying to pull everything together, I cannot thank these people enough.  They make not only make my job doable - they make it easy!

We'll be compiling a detailed chronicle of this year's race, putting together a more detailed history of past races, and mulling over what we learned this year to try to make next year's race better over the coming weeks.  Feel free to check on our website periodically if you're interested in seeing the latest updates. Further, we're always looking for ideas on improving the race.  If anyone has any thoughts, our ears and minds are open.

Once again, thanks to everyone who made this year's race the wonderful event it was.  We'll see you next year for the 2007 MSFS RTW Race!

NOTAMs for the 2006 RTW Race:

Class Aircraft Substitutions.
The following substitutions for improved realism are permitted: DC-3 [MAAM-SIM package; Jay McDaniel or Trev Morson airfiles]; C-172 [RealAir Simulations; FlightOne C-172]; Beech Baron B58 [Dreamfleet Baron B58], Beech King Air 350 [Aeroworx King Air B200].

Alpine Challenge.
The Alpine Challenge area coverage is: (E 5°-12°; N 45°-48°)
The 76m SRTM mesh requirement is satisfied by the relevant FGGenesis, FSGlobal, RealScene, or appropriate payware or freeware world meshes.
For freeware meshes specific to the Alps, see:
Alps. Yohann Baptiste.  AVSIM library. (eur_srtm_07.zip and, optionally, eur_srtm_01.zip). 52mb.
Alps (excellent 38m). Holger Sandmann. AVSIM library. (alpsw_fe.zip, alpse_fe.zip, and alps_up1.zip) 127mb.
Note that a single download will suffice to allow the pilot to fly the Alpine Challenge. For Courchevel (LFLJ), pilots may want to use the RTWR-supplied flatten file for LFLJ and to turn off autogen.

Real Weather.
Pilots may fly using the ActiveSky or the FSMeteo weather generators—set to download current weather with updates when possible.

AFCADS.
The hard work of Reggie fields has enabled the RTWR team to offer a set of AFCADS for the key bonus and corridor airports. These provide minimal lighting for nighttime approaches and parking for multiplayer participation.  They may be found on the official website of the RTWR very soon.

Aircraft Eligibility.

Each year the Committee must consider which aircraft are eligible for the Round the World Race. Our basic principles are "fun and fair" in that we want people to fly their favorite aircraft and that the process be fair for everyone. In addition, we stress realism to the extent that the race is still fun and fair.

During the Race, the Committee will consider challenges. If anyone feels that an aircraft is not eligible for the race, they should submit a challenge. You should state your objection and include any relevant documentation. Others will have a chance to respond quickly. The Committee will take appropriate action.

Here are some decisions made before the Race begins.

AIRCRAFT TYPES NOT ELIGIBLE IN 2006:

V-22 Osprey.
Not enough examples in active service.

The F2G (Goodyear's last version of the F4U Corsair).
Ten were put in service, but those were in testing at Patuxent NAS and found deficient in handling--and decommissioned within two years. Its fame lies in low-level circuit racing.)

Fw 190-D11 and Ta 152C.
The D-11 is labeled as a prototype by Shockwave in their documentation. Apparently 7-13 were built (Shockwave says 7) but we don't know much for sure here--this being a late-war on-the-fly aircraft. The TA 152C is a prototype. (The Fw 190-D9, Fw 190-D13, and the Ta 152H are fine.)


AIRCRAFT MODELS NOT ELIGIBLE IN 2006:

The decisions here do not necessarily reflect on the overall quality of any aircraft model. The design of FS aircraft necessarily involves many compromises. Understandably, many designers choose not to design for performance right at the edge of the flight envelope. But that is where the Race is run. So we shall be in a position of finding some aircraft unsuitable for RTW Race even if they are otherwise excellent aircraft. And, of course, reasonable performance at the edge does not necessarily recommend the aircraft for other purposes.  In all instances we endeavor to arrive at a solution that allows pilots to fly their favorite aircraft while not giving anyone an unrealistic advantage.  We arrive at our decisions after thorough flight testing and having consulted as many knowledgeable people as we realistically can.

For clarification, there are three primary areas of concern for the RTW Race.  We shall term them, for simplicity, power, speed, and fuel economy.  Power refers to the speed an aircraft can maintain in level flight – this comes from the power of its engines – and is our primary concern when considering aircraft eligibility.  Speed refers to the maximum airframe structural speed – the speed at which the aircraft overstresses.  Finally, fuel economy refers to how quickly an aircraft burns fuel.  Our primary concern with fuel economy is the range of an aircraft: we aren't too concerned about people being able to take out fuel to reduce weight, as this doesn't normally impact the race in a significant manner.  The most important of these criteria is 'power' as this most significantly affects what an aircraft can do in a race.  Extreme cases involving speed and fuel economy will be considered, however we will generally allow for some leeway on these.

Lockheed Constellation L-1049G. (Mike Stone and Rey Lopez models.)
Various reasons having to do with unrealistic power, speed, and fuel economy.

Constellation pilots should use the Mike Stone visual model with the Wolfram Beckert airfile (and the Hansjoerg Naegele-Jan Visser panel). Look for vcon20.zip and follow the instructions carefully. A complete package of 3D model, airfile, panel, and sound is available at FligthSim.com. Look for Luis da Costa Pereira as the compiler of the packages for the L-1049G and EC-121.

ATR72 (ARNZ) Jon Murchison.
This ATR72 is 100+ kts too fast. There exist lots of realistic alternatives. For freeware, look for the excellent version by Francisco Sanchez-Casataner. The FlightOne payware version is a real favorite.

Models by Kazunori Ito (several):
Kazunori Ito is known for his outstanding 3d modeling and painting skills. However, our experience with his flight models indicates that they are not suitable for RTW Racing.

Beech Starship (Mike Stone original & Alaskan Winds modification).

The Mike Stone Beech Starship (including the version with the Herb Morse Alaskan Winds modification) is not only too fast (in terms of power plant) but its max_indicated_speed is not close.

For a comparison:

FAA Starship: Vmo: 250 Mmo: 0.60
Stone Starship: max_indicated_speed=385 max_mach=0.65

Rather than ban the Starship or require that the max_indicated_speed be set to 250, the committee has decided on a compromise for this year's race.

Pilots must edit the aircraft.cfg file and enter (or replace) the line

max_indicated_speed=385.000000 // Original numbers
with:
max_indicated_speed=300.000000 // RTWR 2006 numbers

(Look for "Reference Speeds". Be sure to make a backup before editing.) Pilots may not alter other flight characteristics in the aircraft.cfg file. This "Vmo/Vme" Speed Limit will be reported by the Duenna, but the system basically works under "pilot's honor".

This one-year ruling allows pilots to fly the Starship at something approximating full speed but requires care at low altitudes.

2006 APPEALS FINDINGS:
The FSD Piaggio Avanti may be flown without any modification.  Though it's 'speed' as measured by descending flight was high, its 'power' as measured in level flight was not, and we therefore find it suitable for the race.

The Tom “Gnoopey” Kohler P-47 is eligible for the race.  Its 'power' as measured by level flight performance in standard atmospheric conditions was extremely close to the best known values for the real aircraft.  Its 'speed,' as measured by dive performance, was higher than our best value, however we don't find this a significant enough reason to disqualify it.

We faced essentially the same dilemma with these two aircraft.  Both aircraft performed 'hot' in descents, but both were realistic in cruise.  Given that the advantage one can gain from a rapid descent is relatively small we've decided to allow both of these aircraft unmodified in the race.